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Energy

Vote YES to H. Con. Res. 89 and 112

June 9, 2016

U.S. House of Representatives
Washington, D.C. 20515

Dear Representative,

On behalf of the more than one million members and supporters of the Council for Citizens Against Government Waste (CCAGW), I urge you to support H. Con. Res. 89 and H. Con. Res. 112.  These resolutions express the sense of the Congress that President Obama’s climate agenda is burdensome, unnecessary, and costly.    

CCAGW Highlights Select FY2017 E&W Amendments

May 25, 2016

U.S. House of Representatives
Washington, D.C. 20515

Dear Representative,

You will soon begin voting on H.R. 5055, the Energy and Water Development and Related Agencies Appropriations Act, 2017.  On behalf of the more than one million members and supporters of the Council for Citizens Against Government Waste (CCAGW), I urge you to support the following amendments:

Support RFS Reform

May 13, 2016

The Honorable Fred Upton
Chairman

The Honorable Frank Pallone
Ranking Member

Committee on Energy & Commerce
U.S. House of Representatives
Washington, DC 20515

Dear Chairman Upton and Ranking Member Pallone:

CAGW Releases 2016 Congressional Pig Book

For Immediate ReleaseContact: Curtis Kalin 202-467-5318
April 13, 2016 

Schatz: “Earmarks are making an unwelcome comeback”

CCAGW Commends Chairman Hatch For Investigation Into Green Energy Loans

The Honorable Orrin Hatch Chairman

Committee on Finance

U.S. Senate

Washington, D.C. 20510  

Dear Chairman Hatch,  

CAGW Releases March 2016 WasteWatcher

For Immediate ReleaseContact: Curtis Kalin 202-467-5318
March 18, 2016 

(Washington, D.C.) – Today Citizens Against Government Waste (CAGW) released its March WasteWatcher, a monthly dispatch to members of the news media, highlighting some of the most prominent fiscal issues affecting American taxpayers.  The stories from its March edition of WasteWatcher are listed in part as follows:

Pushing Back on the Global Warming Hypothesis

When it comes to global warming, President Obama has often said “the science is settled.”  If that is so then it does not make sense that 300 scientists, engineers, economists, and others sent a letter on January 25, 2016, supporting the House Committee on Science, Space, and Technology for their efforts to “ensure that federal agencies complied with federal guidelines that implemented the Data Quality Act” in their examination of a hotly debated National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) study.  They wrote that the law, also called the Information Quality Act (IQA), “required government-wide guidelines to ‘ensure and maximize the quality, objectivity, utility, and integrity of information, including statistical information,’ that was disseminated to the public.  Individual agencies, such as the EPA, NOAA and many others were required to issue corresponding guidelines and set up mechanisms to allow affected parties to seek to correct information considered erroneous.”  The signatories believe that NOAA, an agency within the Department of Commerce, has failed to follow the IQA and that this “is an issue of international relevance because of the weight given to U.S. Government assessments during international negotiations” such as the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), a body created by the United Nations.

March 18, 2016 — Elizabeth Wright 1458317353

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